Food Preparation Mama: Cookstar

2020 cooking video game

Cooking Mama: Cookstar is a cookery simulation-styled minigame compilation video game, and the sixth main installment in the Cooking Mama series of video games. The game was briefly released on the Nintendo Switch eShop on March 31, 2020, but was taken down just a few hours later due to legal issues between the publisher, Planet Entertainment, and the owner of the Cooking Mama intellectual property (IP), Office Create. The fact that the game released without a public announcement or press statement and was taken down so quickly has led to much speculation about the game’s development and if the game will ever be properly released.[1]

The game is/will be the first main entry in the Cooking Mama series since 2014’s Cooking Mama 5: Bon Appétit!, and the first Cooking Mama game on console since 2008’s Cooking Mama: World Kitchen. A PlayStation 4 version was also announced with the game’s initial announcement in August 2019, but hasn’t released or been advertised by Planet Entertainment since. If the game does release on PS4, it would be the first Cooking Mama game released on a platform that isn’t Nintendo or mobile.

Contents

  • 1 Gameplay
  • 2 Development
  • 3 Release
  • 4 Reception
  • 5 References

Gameplay[edit]

Cooking Mama: Cookstar plays similarly to previous entries in the series. New in Cookstar is the introduction of a vegetarian mode, as well as the ability to share photos of completed recipes on social media. The former was praised by PETA, which had criticized previous Cooking Mama games for having few vegan recipes.[2]

Development[edit]

Cookstar was initially revealed as Cooking Mama: Coming Home to Mama in August 2019, with an estimated release date for Q3 of that year. Its publisher claimed that it was the first implementation of blockchain technology on a major video game console, using the technology to implement a form of digital rights management.[3] The game was developed by American[4] studio 1st Playable Productions, but the company later removed all mentions of the game from its website.[5]

Release[edit]

Cookstar ostensibly released on March 31, 2020. The game was briefly made available on the Nintendo Switch eShop, but pulled shortly after its release.[6] Additionally, the PlayStation 4 version was never released despite being listed on several storefronts. Unconfirmed rumors that the game acted as a cryptocurrency miner emerged shortly after its release.[7] 1st Playable responded that the implementation of blockchain technology was only “hypothetical” and explained that the game’s removal from Nintendo eShop was due to an ongoing legal dispute between the publisher Planet Entertainment and IP rights holder Office Create.[8] Office Create stated it has started taking legal action against Planet as they had terminated their license to use Cooking Mama on March 30, 2020, after which Planet had started selling the game.[9]

Reception[edit]

Cooking Mama: Cookstar received “generally unfavorable” reviews according to review aggregator website Metacritic.[10]

Travis Northup of IGN gave the game 3 out of 10, praising the detailed recipes featured in the game, but criticizing the monotonous gameplay, poor motion controls, “nightmarish” voice acting, and lack of meaningful progression. He also noted that the game does not offer anything new compared to past entries, which combined with the flaws, make Cookstar a “tedious game that does almost nothing well.”[11]

Conversely, TheGamer’s Bella Blondeau gave Cookstar a 4 out of 5. She praised the game’s variety and amount of content, as well as the “nuance” to mastering the mechanics. In addition, she praised the game’s photo mode and Yoko Nishino’s “charming” performance as Mama, stating that the character felt “like a tangible, adorable dork of a mother.”[14]

References[edit]

  • ^ Blondeau, Bella (April 4, 2020). “For Some Reason, The New Cooking Mama Is 2020’s Biggest Gaming Mystery”. TheGamer. Retrieved April 5, 2020..mw-parser-output cite.citation{font-style:inherit}.mw-parser-output .citation q{quotes:”””””””‘””‘”}.mw-parser-output .id-lock-free a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-free a{background-image:url(“//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/65/Lock-green.svg/9px-Lock-green.svg.png”);background-image:linear-gradient(transparent,transparent),url(“//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/65/Lock-green.svg”);background-repeat:no-repeat;background-size:9px;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .id-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .id-lock-registration a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-registration a{background-image:url(“//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-gray-alt-2.svg.png”);background-image:linear-gradient(transparent,transparent),url(“//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2.svg”);background-repeat:no-repeat;background-size:9px;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .id-lock-subscription a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-subscription a{background-image:url(“//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-red-alt-2.svg.png”);background-image:linear-gradient(transparent,transparent),url(“//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2.svg”);background-repeat:no-repeat;background-size:9px;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration{color:#555}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription span,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration span{border-bottom:1px dotted;cursor:help}.mw-parser-output .cs1-ws-icon a{background-image:url(“//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/4/4c/Wikisource-logo.svg/12px-Wikisource-logo.svg.png”);background-image:linear-gradient(transparent,transparent),url(“//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/4c/Wikisource-logo.svg”);background-repeat:no-repeat;background-size:12px;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output code.cs1-code{color:inherit;background:inherit;border:inherit;padding:inherit}.mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-error{display:none;font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-error{font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-maint{display:none;color:#33aa33;margin-left:0.3em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration,.mw-parser-output .cs1-format{font-size:95%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-left,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-left{padding-left:0.2em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-right,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-right{padding-right:0.2em}.mw-parser-output .citation .mw-selflink{font-weight:inherit}
  • ^ Doolan, Liam (August 23, 2019). “Random: Cooking Mama: Cookstar Receives Award From PETA For Including Vegetarian Mode”. Nintendo Life. Retrieved April 5, 2020.
  • ^ O’Connor, James (August 11, 2019). “Cooking Mama: Cookstar Brings Both Vegetarian Meals And Blockchain Technology To Nintendo Switch”. GameSpot. Retrieved April 17, 2020.
  • ^ “Contact Us”. 1st Playable. Retrieved April 11, 2020.
  • ^ Skrebels, Joe (April 3, 2020). “The Cooking Mama Game for Switch That Came Out, and Then Disappeared”. IGN. Retrieved April 5, 2020.
  • ^ Doolan, Liam (April 4, 2020). “Cooking Mama’s New Game Has Been Pulled From The Switch eShop And Nobody Knows Why”. Nintendo Life. Retrieved April 5, 2020.
  • ^ Teuton, Christopher (April 5, 2020). “Cooking Mama Cookstar Rumored To Mine Cryptocurrency, Pulled From eShop”. Screen Rant. Retrieved April 5, 2020.
  • ^ Doolan, Liam (April 4, 2020). “Cooking Mama: Cookstar Cryptocurrency Saga Takes Yet Another Turn As Publisher Blames Coronavirus”. Nintendo Life. Retrieved April 8, 2020.
  • ^ O’Conner, James (April 14, 2020). “Cooking Mama Owners Is Pursuing Legal Action Against Cookstar Developer”. GameSpot. Retrieved April 14, 2020.
  • ^ a b “Cooking Mama: Cookstar”. Metacritic. Retrieved April 21, 2020.
  • ^ a b Northup, Travis (April 15, 2020). “Cooking Mama: Cookstar Review”. IGN. Retrieved April 17, 2020.
  • ^ Vogel, Mitch (April 9, 2020). “Cooking Mama: Cookstar Review”. Nintendo Life. Retrieved April 21, 2020.
  • ^ Green, Steven (April 13, 2020). “Cooking Mama: Cookstar (Switch) Review”. Nintendo World Report. Retrieved April 21, 2020.
  • ^ Blondeau, Bella (April 15, 2020). “Cooking Mama: Cookstar Review: Millennial Mama”. TheGamer. Retrieved April 15, 2020.
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    Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cooking_Mama:_Cookstar