7 Surprising Facts About Dandelions

Dandelions: There’s More to Them Than Meets the Eye

Dandelions are an ornamental weed. That’s right, ornamental. But those golden yellow blooms quickly turn to fluffy seedheads that disperse in the wind (or with the breath of a giddy toddler blowing the seeds into the air). Before you know it, you’ve got a field of these invasive plants where once grew a promising lawn. We all know that dandelions can be annoying — do you know these other surprising facts about dandelions?

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7 Surprising Facts About Dandelions

Pharmacists in 19th-century England made tea from roasted dandelion roots. The drink is still trendy today, thanks to a coffee-like taste and color without caffeine. Did you know that you can age wood with tea bags?
A cup of chopped raw dandelion greens provides 112 percent of the daily requirement for vitamin A (at only 25 calories).
From blossom to root, 100 percent of this weed, which is also an herb, is edible for most people. Here are 10 more useful (and delicious) edible flowers to up your culinary game.
Dandelion flowers reach heights of six to 24 inches, and roots go as deep as 10 to 15 feet. Use these techniques to help prevent the spread of weeds.
Dandelions are part of the daisy family, one of the biggest in botany with more than 1,620 genera of plant types.
A single dandelion head consists of up to 300 ray flowers that look like tiny petals at first glance. By the way: If your garden is all sun and no shade, these plants will add vibrance to your space.
Ray Bradbury’s 1957 novel Dandelion Wine gets its title from the wine the characters make and drink in summer.

Next, read How to get rid other yard nuisances with these 10 tips.